FOOD 4 NYC Project Proposal

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  FOOD 4 NYC is a student project executed at the Strategic Design & Management Graduate program (Managing Creatives and Projects Teams Course) at Parsons The New School for Design. FOOD 4 NYC is an initiative in the city of New York that aims to promote healthy eating through a playful, fun, and informative campaign by utilizing a PSA campaign that promotes the mobile App. FOOD 4 NYC provides a holistic awareness in how citizens can take action to improve their health with a variety of options. FOOD 4 NYC hopes to add the fun back to healthy living by reconnecting the community to their love for food.
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  • 1. FOOD 4 NYC Nick Makhatadze Susann Krug Cecilia Steele Ryan Blum-Kryzstal Kyle Shum Sara Aboulhosn photo credit: http://hiwyhi.wordpress.com/
  • 2. Should access to healthy food be a right? photo credit: http://www.peteradamsphoto.com/
  • 3. photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lyza/49545547 What do citizens do when they are over dependent on an industrial food system?
  • 4. photo credit: http://www.natureworldnews.com/ What are the long-term consequences of perpetuating the status quo of unsustainable eating?
  • 5. The Center for Economic Opportunity reports that the New York City poverty rate is the highest it has been since 2005. Food 4 NYC is an initiative that seeks to increase awareness, accessibility, and inspire action for citizens of the NYC metro region to eat healthier by providing targeted information about where to access healthy food specific to where citizens live in the five boroughs. Our aim is to diminish the perception that eating healthy is only for people with means, to promote that organic/sustainable food is accessible to all citizens, and enhance awareness in how citizens can participate in their own wellness.
  • 6. THE CORE ISSUE
  • 7. photo credit: http://www.nycvisit.com/ LACK OF INFORMATION Citizens of NY metro area lack holistic awareness of information pertaining to healthy eating and shopping options.
  • 8. OUR AIM IS TO DO THIS IN A TWO PRONGED APPROACH: 1. Targeted messaging through an aggressive PSA campaign with the city of NY, MTA and social media channels to focus positive tactics to encourage citizens to eat healthier by increasing awareness of where to access healthy food to allow citizens to make informed choices. 2. Food 4 NYC mobile app will be the central resource designed to aggregate information from existing data sets, geo locations, and health apps to empower healthy living. One location where information about urban/community farms, farmers markets, Green carts, co-ops, and CSA’s are located.
  • 9. photo credit: http://www.debatingeurope.eu/ Our purpose is to create a sustainable future in healthy living for all generations through collective action and education.
  • 10. photo credit: http://cultivatinghealthyplaces.com/ Our mission is to cultivate awareness through targeted education and mobile technology to amplify access to healthy eating, living and well-being in a fun engaging manner.
  • 11. NYC already has a coalition of city organizations working to increase awareness and enhance accessibility to healthy food through the NYC Food initiative. The challenge is that much of the information is buried in the NYC.gov website and not fully accessible to all citizens using 21st century tools. Food 4 NYC wants to amplify existing systems and provide a platform for new systems to plug-in using an open API framework.
  • 12. photo credit:http://youthvoices.net/ According to City Harvest and the city of New York, food insecurity is prevalent throughout the NY metro area. Food insecurity refers to USDA’s measure of lack of access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members; limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods.
  • 13. FOOD INSECURITY, FOOD DESERTS AND FOOD JUSTICE. According to a study commissioned by the NYC department of city planning an estimated 750,000 New York City residents live in food deserts, while about three million people live in places where stores that sell fresh produce are few or far away. Supermarkets throughout New York City have closed down in recent years due to increasing rents and shrinking profit margins, but the disappearance of urban grocery stores has had the most serious impact on low-income communities, especially those that are predominantly African-American (such East/Central Harlem and North/Central Brooklyn). To fill this void, the city started its Green Carts program, which has been bringing affordable fresh fruits and vegetables to underserved areas while providing jobs for vendors since 2008. Hundreds of Green Carts are already on the streets in food deserts, and that number is rapidly increasing as prospective vendors obtain training, licenses and permits from the city.
  • 14. FARMERS MARKETS Farmers markets have been on the rise throughout the NY metro area. Starting in 2006, NYC started the health bucks program to allow citizens to use their resources from food stamps, SNAP, WIC, and EBT to shop at farmers markets. Farmers markets that offered Health Bucks coupons to SNAP recipients averaged higher daily EBT sales than markets without the incentive. Farmers Markets are still considered to be cost prohibitive and not always provide culturally appropriate food. Food 4 NYC would make it easy for all citizens to find the right farmers market for their needs. photo credit: lambbeforethyme.wordpress.com
  • 15. URBAN FARMS According to Five Borough Farm project urban agriculture is booming in New York City, with more than 700 food-producing urban farms and gardens citywide. In all five boroughs, New Yorkers have turned vacant lots and rooftops, schoolyards and NYCHA gardens into places to grow food. Food 4 NYC wants to increase awareness about where these farms are located. photo credit: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/
  • 16. FOOD JUSTICE JustFood.org defines food justice as “communities exercising their right to grow, sell, and eat healthy food. Healthy food is defined as fresh, nutritious, affordable, culturally-appropriate, and grown locally with care for the well-being of the land, workers, and animals. People practicing food justice leads to a strong local food system, self-reliant communities, and a healthy environment.” photo credit: Chicago Botanic Garden
  • 17. Our objective is to cultivate awareness that captures people’s attention in understanding the ways to provide healthier decisions to the community and environment at large. OUR OBJECTIVE
  • 18. Utilizing an aggressive PSA campaign to grab the public, Food 4 NYC can take their initial interest and transform it with a mobile app that serves as an information resource that connects all groups of people (ranging from first-time organic food purchasers to the farmers). OUR STRATEGY
  • 19. Through interviews with everyday citizens in NY metro area Food 4 NYC found that people either are too busy, too poor, too overwhelmed, or too ignorant to fully engage in healthy eating. Because of citizens’ environments/schedules, finding options to purchase/consume organic foods become more of a chore rather than an enjoyable experience. ARCHANAEntrepreneur51st and 2nd Ave., NYQuestionsCATHYPhotographerQueens, NY1. What’s your age?36345. I don’t. It would probably change my habits if I knew where it came from but it might be better not to know5. Sometimes. As long as it’s organic I’m hap- py but if I see New Zealand for ex I’m happier because I know those countries are stricter with their food policies. 5. Do you know where your fruits and veggies come from? If not, would it make a difference in your grocery shopping habits if you knew? 6. Contains no pesticides, GMOs, an- tibiotics, growth hormones, anything like that6. Organic food is less contaminated and less touched, more natural. That’s what it means to me but I have no idea how the US classi- fies it. 6. What does organic food mean to you? 2. Oh ever... My favorite meals are coming from Brooklyn. Food in Manhattan doesn’t impress me, it’s mediocre. Food in Brooklyn is so different. 2. That’s a tough one. I guess in Paris at a corner cafe having steak and potatoes and wine. It tasted really good but I guess the ambiance as well2. Best dining experience ever in their lifetime4. Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s4. Whole Foods. I try to buy everything or- ganic but sometimes they don’t have an organic option and I buy it anyway but I’m not happy about it. I think organic is a little better than the rest of the food. I don’t trust it completely in terms of pesticides and good health but it’s something that seems to be better. I didn’t see a big jump from buying non-organic to organic price wise going to Wholefoods but everywhere else there was. 4. Where do you buy yourorganic food from? 10. Probably eating more fruits and vege- tables. A Dominican diet has rice every day, I wished I didn’t eat that all the time10. Eat less carbs and less bread. I’m a vege- tarian and I don’t eat a lot of vegetables so it bothers me a little, every meal comes with bread10. What would you like to change about your diet but find hard to? 8. No8. No, I live in Manhattan8. Do you garden? 11. Not really, I’ve been trying to lately.11. No11. Do you exercise, what kind of exercise do you do? 7 A lot of labels say natural which doesn’t mean they are organic, and a lot of labels say organic but the product only contains one or two organic ingre- dients, it still contains stuff that is pro- cessed so you have to read everything. I read everything. I won’t buy anything that has high fructose corn syrup, you eve find that in breads, salad dressings, everything7. I always look at it. Organic labels are slight- ly easier to understand but if I see a lot of ingredients and chemical sounding names that puts me off a bit, I prefer if it says 2 or 3 ingredients, if not there is too much in there. 7. What do you think of organic labels? 3. I don’t really buy any pre-packaged stuff. I prefer organic but I don’t really buy organic because around me there aren’t really a lot of selections3. Mainly organic, I try as much as I can.3. Food preference organic, local, indifferent, fresh, pre- packaged, eat out mostly? 9. Sometimes. Grilled chicken and vegetables, salad. When I cook I cook healthy. 9. Yes. Anything vegetarian. I make a lot of Indian food. Pasta, rice, pizza, sandwiches, nothing too elaborate. 9. Do you cook? if so, what kind of food do you like to cook? 12. Expensive12. Expensive12. What is your perception of “Farmers Market”? 43434343434343434343434343434343 INTERVIEWS
  • 20. In order to understand the simple behaviors that needed to be changed, we categorized our findings into personas. By grouping our responses, we can find our target market in our goal to change behavior that will lead the everyday citizens to make cognizant lifestyle choices that promote healthy living and a better environment. PERSONAS
  • 21. We were able to categorize people’s perceptions into 4 main personas:
  • 22. I’M SO BUSY NAME: HEATHER PEARCE AGE: 42 OCCUPATION: PR EXECUTIVE, MOTHER EDUCATION LEVEL: GRADUATE SCHOOL HOME LIFE: MOTHER OF 2, WORKS 5 DAYS/WEEK SOMETIMES HAS TO WORK OVERTIME DEPENDING ON EVENTS, KIDS AFTERNOON ACTIVITIES & HOMEWORK, WEEKENDS ARE FAMILY ORIENTED AND INVOLVE LUNCHES, DINNERS, PLAYDATES AND GET TOGETHERS. LIVES IN... LIFESTYLE: ON THE RUN ALL THE TIME, LONG LIST OF THINGS TO DO, EVERYTHING IS DONE QUICKLY & EFFICIENTLY ATTITUDE: I HAVE ENOUGH THINGS TO DO AND TAKE CARE OF, I DON’T HAVE THE TIME TO THINK LET ALONE TAKE CARE OF MYSELF. I CARE ABOUT MY HEALTH AND MY CHILDRENS HEALTH BUT I DONT HAVE TIME TO BE EXTRA PICKY AS TO WHERE I SHOULD BUY TOMATOES. TOMATOES ARE TOMATOES RIGHT? EATS / SHOPS AT: NEIGHBORHOOD SUPERMARKETS AND BODEGAS, WHOLEFOODS, FRESH DIRECT MOTIVATION/TRIGGER: CHILDRENS HEALTH, ILLNESS, LONG TERM EFFECTS COMFORT WITH TECHNOLOGY: TECH SAVY. OWNS HER IPAD, IPHONE AND LAPTOP. “I AM SO BUSY, I DO NOT HAVE THE TIME OR PATIENCE TO THINK ABOUT HOW I SHOULD CHANGE MY LIFESTYLE AND BE HEALTHY.”
  • 23. I’M SO POOR NAME: JORDAN GOMEZ AGE: 36 OCCUPATION: WAITRESS, SINGLE MOTHER EDUCATION LEVEL: HIGH SCHOOL HOME LIFE: MOTHER OF 3, WORKS 6 DAYS/WEEK, TAKES ON EXTRA SHIFTS WHEN SHE CAN. CHILDREN ARE 16, 12 AND 8. SHE QUALIFIES FOR EBT. LIVES ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF QUEENS IN A 2 BEDROOM APT. LIFESTYLE: TRYING TO GET BY DAY BY DAY. ITS ABOUT SURVIVAL, PAYING THE BILLS, MAKING SURE THE KIDS GO TO SCHOOL, DO THEIR HOMEWORK, STAY OUT OF TROUBLE, HAVE FOOD ON THE TABLE ATTITUDE: HAVING FOOD ON THE TABLE IS A BLESSING THAT WE CAN NOT BE TOO PICKY ABOUT. I CAN NOT AFFORD WHOLEFOODS, ORGANIC OR EATING OUT ALL THE TIME. IF WE DO EAT OUT, THEN I TREAT THE KIDS TO MCDONALDS OR KFC. EATS / SHOPS AT: NEIGHBORHOOD SUPERMARKETS AND BODEGAS, FAST FOOD RESTAURANTS, MOTIVATION/TRIGGER: MONEY - HEALTHY FOOD IS NOT THAT EXPENSIVE, FARMERS MARKETS WELCOME EBT, WIC, MEAL PLANNER CAN AID IN BUYING ONLY WHAT IS NEEDED. HEALTH, ILLNESS COMFORT WITH TECHNOLOGY: SMART PHONE. BASIC “I AM TRYING TO STAY AFLOAT. I DO WHAT I CAN FOR MY FAMILY AND KNOW THAT I SHOULD BE TAKING BETTER CARE OF THEIR HEALTH AND WELLBEING BUT THIS IS WHAT I CAN AFFORD”
  • 24. I’M SO IGNORANT NAME: GEORGE LIVINGSTENE AGE: 26 OCCUPATION: GRADUATE STUDENT, SINGLE EDUCATION LEVEL: GRADUATE SCHOOL HOME LIFE: HAS 3 ROOMATES, LIVES IN WILLAMSBERG. STUDIES AT NYU. WORKS PART TIME AT THE UNIVERISTY TO EARN EXTRA MONEY. FAMILY LVES IN OHIO. EATS OUT MOST OF THE TIME. LIFESTYLE: STUDYING AND UNIVERSITY TAKE UP MOST OF HIS TIME. PART OF A FEW CLUBS. LOVES EXPLORING THE CITY. FIRST TIME ON HIS OWN, BEING INDEPENDANT. NOT TOO KEEN ON COOKING. ATTITUDE: FOOD ON THE GO OR GOING OUT WITH FRIENDS TO GRAB A BITE TO EAT. SHOPS AT THE CLOSEST STORES. ASSUMES THAT ALL VEGGIES AND FRUITS ARE HEALTHY, AS LONG AS HE STAYS AWAY FROM FASTFOOD. MOTIVATION/TRIGGER: FINDING AN OUTLET THAT CAN GUIDE HIM ON BEING HEALTHY. THE FOOD YOU EAT IS NOT WHAT IT SEEMS EATS / SHOPS AT: NEIGHBORHOOD SUPERMARKETS AND BODEGAS, RESTAURANTS, COMFORT WITH TECHNOLOGY: TECH SAVVY “I JUST READ AN ARTICLE THAT TALKS ABOUT GMO’S AND PESTICIDE FOUND IN OUR FOOD. I HAVE BEEN IGNORANT SO FAR IN KNOWING WHAT I AM PUTTING IN MY SYSTEM... NOW THAT I KNOW HOW DO I START BEING HEALTHIER?”
  • 25. I’M THE FARMER NAME: BRIAN GEORGIA AGE: 53 OCCUPATION: FARMER EDUCATION LEVEL: UNDERGRADUATE IN AGRICULTURE HOME LIFE: LIVES IN UPSTATE NEWYORK IN HIS FARM WITH HIS FAMILY. INHERITED THE BUSINESS FROM HIS FATHER. LIFESTYLE: HE IS AWARE ABOUT FOOD JUSTICE AND SUSTAINABILITY, THAT IS WHY HE CARRIED ON WITH THE FAMILY BUSINESS. THE WHOLE FAMILY HELPS OUT, HIS STAFF LOVE THIER JOB, HE LOVES WHAT HE DOES AND BELIEVES IF MORE BUSINESSES THOUGHT LIKE HIM, OUR WORLD WOULD BE A BETTER PLACE ATTITUDE: BELIEVES THAT FOOD IS NO LONGER WHAT IT USED TO BE WITH THE INCLUSION OF THE “BIG FARMERS” INTO THE SYSTEM. HE STILL BELIEVES IN THE OLD WAYS OF DOING THINGS - GIVING HIS CUSTOMERS HEALTHY, SEASONAL AND ORGANIC PRODUCE. MOTIVATION/TRIGGER: SUSTAINABILITY. HEALTH. PROFIT EATS / SHOPS AT: FARMERS MARKETS, CO-OP COMFORT WITH TECHNOLOGY: BASIC “I AM AN INDEPENDANT FARMER TRYING TO MAKE MY LIVING BY PROVIDING ORGANIC, PESTICIDE FREE AND NATURAL FOOD TO THE COMMUNITY, MY ONLY PROBLE IS THAT REVENUES ARE NOT AS GOOD AS THEY SHOULD BE, HOW CAN I KEEP MY BUSINESS SUSTAINABLE?”
  • 26. These personas develop our target audience for the campaign. With a face and personality attached to creating a sustainable future, we can take our strategies and apply it with these personas in mind. With empathy, we understand the behaviors that govern these people when concepts pertaining to “urban farming” and “farmers markets” come into play. photo credit: http://www.emloves.com/
  • 27. OUR JOURNEY MAPPING PROCESS
  • 28. photo credit: http://galleryhip.com/local-farmers-market-people.html With the help of the Journey Mapping tool, we identified different areas of consumer attitudes towards food and healthy eating. Consumers across the spectrum with diverse backgrounds had low level of understanding what healthy eating meant, the difference between organic and natural, and that the cost of entry was prohibitive for the majority. Their perceptions of urban farms/farmers markets was also skewed to something that was elitist.
  • 29. photo credit: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/ These are the five key funnels of the Journey Mapping process; the benefit of having this structure enables us to go in and out of any funnel at any point in time. Because of its non-linear approach, the funnels are circular, ever-changing, living and breathing things.
  • 30. JOURNEY MAP DISCOVER RESEARCH CHOOSE PURCHASE ADVOCATE IGNORANCE - LACK OF EDUCATION - CONFUSION OF WHAT IS “TRUE” AROUND “ORGANIC” OR “ NATURAL” - WILL POWER URBAN FARMING - PERCIEVED AS DIRTY (POLLUTION) FARMERS MARKETS - EXPENSIVE / ELITIST - IMPORTANT 4 CITIES - HEALTHY FOOD JUSTICE - EQUALITY. ACCESS. AFFORDABLE BEHAVIOR - ACCESSIBILE - CONVENIENT - PRICE - QUALITY RESOURCES - WORD OF MOUTH - INTERNET - TV - DIRECT CONTACT W FARMERS DIET ILLNESS/ DISEASE AWARENESS - EDUCATION - FITNESS - PRIORITIZING FLEXIBILITY - BABY STEPS PLANNING HEALTH - NUTRITION UNCONVENTIONAL - CSA - CO OP - FAMRNERS MARKET - URBAN FARM - GROW YOUR OWN * TOMATOES * HERBS - RESTAURANT SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE RSA ACCESSIBILITY AFFORDABILITY - FOODSTAMPS - EDUCATE DISSENFRANCHISED EDUCATION - RECIPES - MEAL PLANNING PARENTS/TEACHERS FARMER/FOOD 101 APP - AVAILABILITY/ SEASOAL - OPTIONS - RECIPES/MEAL PLANNING - INCENTIVE RESTAURANT SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE
  • 31. Our intention is to change consumer behaviors by amplifying healthy eating options and educating consumers on ways to eat healthier. We aim to shift the shame/fear based language utilized by NYC government and engage citizens with more positive, fun, and proactive ways to change behavior.
  • 32. In order to deliver on our mission, we knew that we had to find ways to generate awareness on living a healthy lifestyle, educate consumers on healthy living, with eating being at the center of it all, and promote an understanding that healthy eating does not have to be this cumbersome, overly expensive proposition.
  • 33. The Journey Mapping process helped us create two main deliverables: 1. Create a health awareness campaign/ MTA 2. Develop a Food App in NYC showcasing information in fun and engaging manner.
  • 34. THE CONCEPT
  • 35. THE CONCEPT
  • 36. THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY STORYBOARDS
  • 37. OUR LOGIC MODEL
  • 38. A critical path leading up to developing the stakeholder map and continuing onwards to the prototyping phase, the Logic Model served as the tool to dig deeper into understanding of what tools, resources, talent, partnerships/affiliations are needed to bring our project to fruition and turn it into a success.
  • 39. As we started fleshing out different buckets within the logic model, we identified means of engagement and ways of communication channels needed to deliver the message. We knew that logic model required very meticulous work from each stakeholder. If we ensured right sets of inputs from the very beginning, more laser focused our outputs would be, ultimately garnering stronger results.
  • 40. INPUTS ACTIVITIES OUTPUTS OUTCOMES IMPACT NYC DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH / COMMISSIONER – Deputy Commissioner Epidemiology – Deputy Commissioner Health Promotion and Disease Prevention NYC MAYOR’S OFFICE Obesity Task Force MTA Advertising & Telecommunications/Utilities Messages to communicate on public transportation posters Collaborations different commissioners in Department of Health Data research MTA posters on subways and buses Provides information regarding organic options based on location/train line Multiple phases of posters to get attention Link each poster app and social media Diminish the symptoms to greater disease Diminish health costs & healthcare Diverse collective action Introduce new consumers to alternative ways to being healthy Global to Local awareness driver Partners to cross borders and extend the healthy eating messaging to other markets ensuring the local nuances are taken into consideration for maximum impact and local consumer engagement Better Health Long-term benefits from changes in eating habits FOOD JUSTICE LOCAL ECONOMY STIMULI DIMINISH L
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